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February 11, 2021 - May 29, 2021

*As of March 20, 2020, the opening of this exhibition has been postponed from February 11, 2021 to April 2021. We will share exact exhibition dates as soon as possible*

In April 2021, the Center for Architecture will present Still Together, an exhibition analyzing architecture’s role in envisioning new dynamics of living and community. Contemporary American culture is increasingly disconnected, with people divided by needs, generations, and beliefs. In the face of social isolation, the exhibition will explore the belief that environments which foster cooperation, interaction, and mutual assistance can be an antidote to the intense divisions in American life.

The negative impacts of social estrangement extend, but are not limited to, the isolation of aging populations and people with physical limitations. Cities, suburbs, and rural areas wittingly and unwittingly separate these groups from larger communities in favor of spaces designed according to age, needs, or income, but their well-being would be improved by active inclusion in society. Still Together will explore how architecture can address this, while helping to create communities that foster inclusion in the broadest of terms.

See the RFP and start your submission > 

While much of the mythology and ethos of American life revolves around individualism, it is possible to celebrate other strains of American social, architectural, and urban culture.  With episodic intensity, collaborative ideals and communitarian utopian visions have captivated the United States and left a legacy of experiments in spatial organization of communities of mutual respect and caring. The exhibition will display architectural drawings, photographs, scale models, etc. to illustrate how historic examples from different moments and traditions, including such Utopian experiments as New Harmony, Indiana, encouraged communal living, or how architects experimented with different paradigms of living together, such as the Schindler House in West Hollywood. Together with the historic examples, the exhibition will showcase contemporary case studies in the United States and abroad that have posited radical mixtures and alternative solutions, from ideas of communities that support and integrate Alzheimer’s patients or those suffering from dementia to those that incorporate the needs of transient communities.

While the historic and contemporary case studies demonstrate ways that designers have helped foster community, many of them do so by focusing on specific target groups—isolated religious communes, mothers-to-be, people with disabilities, or seniors with dementia. Still Together hopes to prompt designers to envision radically different environments that promote a broader and more holistic approach to inclusion. The final part of the exhibition features five proposals from five interdisciplinary teams who will design environments that encourage new ways of living collaboratively. Proposed sites will be located throughout the country, encompassing the regional differences that characterize the United States.

As part of the exhibition the Center for Architecture will commission work based on an open call.

The Center for Architecture and the competition jury will select up to five teams to envision new dynamics of living and community that challenge urban trends toward ever-increasing isolation. This call requires interdisciplinary teams, comprised of social scientists and designers.

Selected teams will study and propose designs that explore new ways of staying together, considering cross-generational living and designing for different abilities, but also broader ideas around inclusion and access. Teams are encouraged to develop their ideas around one of more of five typologies–residential (both permanent and temporary), public space, workplace, healthcare, and civic/institutional. We hope that these proposals will operate beyond the individual unit, addressing environments of multiple scales, and exploring ideas of process and policy. The RFP calls for provocative and realizable proposals that reimagine patterns of living and community building. Selected teams will choose sites throughout the country to encompass the diverse environments that characterize the United States.

Co-Curators:
Barry Bergdoll, Meyer Schapiro Professor of Art History and Archaeology, 19th- and 20th-century Architectural History, Columbia University
Juliana Barton, Ph.D. Candidate, History of Art, University of Pennsylvania

Exhibition Designer:
Natasha Jen, Pentagram

See the RFP and start your submission > 

February 11, 2021 - May 29, 2021

*As of March 20, 2020, the opening of this exhibition has been postponed from February 11, 2021 to April 2021. We will share exact exhibition dates as soon as possible*

In April 2021, the Center for Architecture will present Still Together, an exhibition analyzing architecture’s role in envisioning new dynamics of living and community. Contemporary American culture is increasingly disconnected, with people divided by needs, generations, and beliefs. In the face of social isolation, the exhibition will explore the belief that environments which foster cooperation, interaction, and mutual assistance can be an antidote to the intense divisions in American life.

The negative impacts of social estrangement extend, but are not limited to, the isolation of aging populations and people with physical limitations. Cities, suburbs, and rural areas wittingly and unwittingly separate these groups from larger communities in favor of spaces designed according to age, needs, or income, but their well-being would be improved by active inclusion in society. Still Together will explore how architecture can address this, while helping to create communities that foster inclusion in the broadest of terms.

See the RFP and start your submission > 

While much of the mythology and ethos of American life revolves around individualism, it is possible to celebrate other strains of American social, architectural, and urban culture.  With episodic intensity, collaborative ideals and communitarian utopian visions have captivated the United States and left a legacy of experiments in spatial organization of communities of mutual respect and caring. The exhibition will display architectural drawings, photographs, scale models, etc. to illustrate how historic examples from different moments and traditions, including such Utopian experiments as New Harmony, Indiana, encouraged communal living, or how architects experimented with different paradigms of living together, such as the Schindler House in West Hollywood. Together with the historic examples, the exhibition will showcase contemporary case studies in the United States and abroad that have posited radical mixtures and alternative solutions, from ideas of communities that support and integrate Alzheimer’s patients or those suffering from dementia to those that incorporate the needs of transient communities.

While the historic and contemporary case studies demonstrate ways that designers have helped foster community, many of them do so by focusing on specific target groups—isolated religious communes, mothers-to-be, people with disabilities, or seniors with dementia. Still Together hopes to prompt designers to envision radically different environments that promote a broader and more holistic approach to inclusion. The final part of the exhibition features five proposals from five interdisciplinary teams who will design environments that encourage new ways of living collaboratively. Proposed sites will be located throughout the country, encompassing the regional differences that characterize the United States.

As part of the exhibition the Center for Architecture will commission work based on an open call.

The Center for Architecture and the competition jury will select up to five teams to envision new dynamics of living and community that challenge urban trends toward ever-increasing isolation. This call requires interdisciplinary teams, comprised of social scientists and designers.

Selected teams will study and propose designs that explore new ways of staying together, considering cross-generational living and designing for different abilities, but also broader ideas around inclusion and access. Teams are encouraged to develop their ideas around one of more of five typologies–residential (both permanent and temporary), public space, workplace, healthcare, and civic/institutional. We hope that these proposals will operate beyond the individual unit, addressing environments of multiple scales, and exploring ideas of process and policy. The RFP calls for provocative and realizable proposals that reimagine patterns of living and community building. Selected teams will choose sites throughout the country to encompass the diverse environments that characterize the United States.

Co-Curators:
Barry Bergdoll, Meyer Schapiro Professor of Art History and Archaeology, 19th- and 20th-century Architectural History, Columbia University
Juliana Barton, Ph.D. Candidate, History of Art, University of Pennsylvania

Exhibition Designer:
Natasha Jen, Pentagram

See the RFP and start your submission > 

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